Peace Out 2017!

2017 has been a roller coaster ride. I have climbed, & stood tall, at the top of many mountains and I’ve fallen into valleys. I’ve experienced suffering, sadness, hope and happiness. Sometimes all in the same day. I was stranded in one place & I have traveled to different places. I thought I was horrible at art & I felt like an artist. We lost a dog (Scrappy) & we gained a dog (Fae). I learned I will eventually need a kidney transplant & we learned that my mom and brother are both matches. I found out I need a hip replacement & I found an amazing surgeon. I lost friends & gained new friends.

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Boston, MA – July 2017

What I am getting at here is that with every “bad” thing that has happened to me, something good has also happened. Sometimes not right away, but good things have always come. So we can’t sit on the negatives when surely something good is soon to come. While I know challenges are ahead in 2018, I made it through 2016 and through 2017…I can make it through anything. One year is only 1/26 of my life…that is only 3.8%. And as each year comes that percentage will become less and less. So in time, these challenging years will be a tiny percentage of my life as whole.

I have 8 goals for the new year and I want to be held accountable to reach my goals. So I am making all of them known.

1. Every week, write down at least 1 positive thing that has happened to me. Save them and read them to myself on 12/31/2018.

2. Partake in at least 5 fundraising/volunteer events throughout the year. Whether it is at an event or raising awareness for a cause.

3. Keep a positive mind.

4. Get a new hip and use my new hip to exercise more.

5. Travel to 3 places I have never been before.

6. Go on my first hike since transplant.

7. Make it to Wilmington, NC to learn more about where my donor, Samantha, is from.

8. Take a cooking class & cook more often.

I hope each of you have learned and grown during 2017. And I wish you the most health and happiness during 2018. Stay positive, stay happy and stay strong!! And remember that good things are always to come!

And with that I will say, Happy New Year!!

Some photos from 2017:

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First Lungaversary celebrated with friends
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Getting asked to be in my donor’s sister’s (Sara) wedding
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Fab Fae
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Stone Tower Winery fun with friends
Peace 2017
Peace out 2017!
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My Mom is Simply Amazing

Mom1November is National Caregivers Month so I thought this was the right time to post about a very special person, my mom. I don’t even know if one simple blog post will do her justice, but I’ll try. Being a caregiver isn’t easy. It means you’re committed to helping someone, before you can help yourself. It means that you’re willing to put someone else’s needs before your own. Being someone’s caregiver is a choice, it’s not a requirement. And the decision to be one is done out of love. My mom is not only my caregiver but she is also my Dad’s, who has muscular dystrophy.

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NYC Summer 2017

The thing is, my mom didn’t chose this life. When she married my dad neither of them knew he had MD and they definitely were not expecting to have a child with Cystic Fibrosis. She has never once complained about the life that was chosen for her. She juggles taking care of my dad, myself and finding time for things she loves. If you walk into her bedroom you will find lots of yarn, spinning wheels and a weaving loom. Textiles are her thing and she is an amazing knitter. She can make anything from a simple scarf to a complex sweater. When she has to miss a knitting retreat or dinner with friends to help my dad or me, she says that she wants to be there with us. That she would rather be there to help us get through our struggle than go have fun with her friends. If that’s not pure love, then I am not sure what is.Mom3

You see, I’m alive today because of my mom. As a child you never want to do hours of treatments a day or spend time in the hospital. But my mom ensured everything got done and would spend every day with me in the hospital, finding ways to entertain me during it all. She kept my medications ordered and organized over the years and has spent hours at a time working through insurance issues. Now a days, I manage my own medications but that is because my mom set me up for success when it was my time to take it over. She prepared me for when Cystic Fibrosis would become my disease and when I would have to do things on my own.

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Mt. Vernon Rehab Hospital (Oct. 2016)

Last summer when I was in the hospital she came every single day. My mom’s presence made me comfortable. Some nights after she would leave me for the evening, I would be uncomfortable and unable to get to bed. I would send her a text telling her I couldn’t get comfortable or to sleep and she would jump back into the car and come back to the hospital until I fell asleep. Her presence made me comfortable. Her presence makes a lot of people comfortable.

Everyone who knows my mom can attest to the type of person she is. She is a firecracker and knows how to handle a tough situation. When I was in the ICU last summer, the nurses knew she was a ball of fire. She taught kids in drug rehab and every single one of them loved her, they learned from her and they graduated high school because of her. She knows how to give that tough love that many people need. My mom is also very loving. She always wants a hug in exchange for a glass of milk and would never let go if it was up to her. I still notice her frequently embracing my dad even though he can’t hug her back. That’s the thing about my mom, she does things out of the kindness of her heart and never expects anything in return.Mom2

So this month, for national caregiver month, I wanted to make sure everyone reading my blog knew how amazing my mom is. How amazing of a caregiver she is. How kind of a person she is. And how I’m alive today because of her. If you’re ever privileged enough to meet her, you’re one lucky person.

Why not me?

I learned a valuable lesson from my dad. Dad & IHe is 59 years old and has had muscular dystrophy for the past thirty years of his life. We understand each other & I think it’s because, although very different, we both have medical conditions.

People often post about loved ones never asking why, seeming to make them appear stronger. But the fact is, they probably internalized the question “Why me?” at some point after a difficult diagnosis. They just chose to move forward, accept the life they were given and make the best of it.

It’s human nature for the thought to come across our minds and we shouldn’t feel bad about it. We also should never sulk on it, either. Because the answer to “Why me?”, it will most likely never be found.

When I was laying in the hospital bed last year, only able to move my fingers, unable to breathe on my own, the thought “Why me?” ran through my mind. I cried. At first, I cried every single day. I stared into space, a lot. I felt emotions I still can’t even comprehend or express. I was so thankful to be alive and to see my mom’s face when she walked into my hospital room every day. I was also in a lot of pain, physically and emotionally.

So when “Why me?” crossed my mind, I remembered what my dad had said. “Why not me?” I wasn’t exempt from bad things happening. I am no more or less special than the person who was sitting next to me on the train on Sunday. No more or less special than anyone. This is what I think people forget. Sure, not everyone ends up in a medically induced coma for a month and even fewer people have to experience daily life with Cystic Fibrosis. But we are all equal. And no one is exempt from life. If you’re fortunate enough never to have to deal with something bad happening, then I am jealous. But I don’t thing that person exists and if they do, let me know.

So next time you ask “Why me?” in a bad situation, don’t feel ashamed about it. But always follow it with “Why not me?”. You at least will have an answer.